Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society - Jean Sampson Scott Greater New York Chapter
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The Abolition of the Slave Trade presents more than 8,000 pages of original essays, primary documents—books, pamphlets, articles, and illustrations—as well as secondary sources and original maps. The site is organized around eight themes that tell the forgotten story of the abolition of the transatlantic slave trade to the United States and, more generally, to the Western Hemisphere. Each theme is presented through an essay, images, and texts.
Last Updated: 24 January 2016   [Located in Category: Study and Analysis]
From about the 1690s until 1794, both free and enslaved Africans were buried in a 6.6-acre burial ground in Lower Manhattan, outside the boundaries of the settlement of New Amsterdam, later known as New York. Lost to history due to landfill and development, the grounds were rediscovered in 1991 as a consequence of the planned construction of a Federal office building.
Last Updated: 25 September 2015   [Located in Category: Slave Burials]
African Origins contains information about the migration histories of Africans forcibly carried on slave ships into the Atlantic. Using the personal details of 91,491 Africans liberated by International Courts of Mixed Commission and British Vice Admiralty Courts, this resource makes possible new geographic, ethnic, and linguistic data on peoples captured in Africa and pulled into the slave trade.
Last Updated: 25 September 2015   [Located in Category: Trans Atlantic Slave Trade]
Records kept by the slave owner are frequently the only clue to our ancestors, particularly during the period 1619-1869. We have designed this site to assist the African-ancestored researcher throughout the Diaspora to find a path to the last slaveholder or the suspected last slaveholder. The site is also designed to assist descendants of slaveholders and other researchers, to share information they find with any slave reference in records.
Last Updated: 11 August 2019   [Located in Category: Slave in Court Records]
A project of the University of Virginia, this database of slave narratives includes a sampling of some of the 2,300+ interviews and photos of former slaves taken between 1936 and 1938 with first-hand accounts of their experiences.
Last Updated: 11 August 2019   [Located in Category: Slave Narratives]
Born in Slavery: Slave Narratives from the Federal Writers' Project, 1936-1938 contains more than 2,300 first-person accounts of slavery and 500 black-and-white photographs of former slaves. These narratives were collected in the 1930s as part of the Federal Writers' Project of the Works Progress Administration (WPA) and assembled and microfilmed in 1941 as the seventeen-volume Slave Narratives: A Folk History of Slavery in the United States from Interviews with Former Slaves.
Last Updated: 24 January 2016   [Located in Category: Slave Narratives]
The Center for the Study of Slavery and Justice (CSSJ) is a scholarly research center with a public humanities mission. Recognizing that racial and chattel slavery were central to the historical formation of the Americas and the modern world, the CSSJ creates a space for the interdisciplinary study of the historical forms of slavery while also examining how these legacies shape our contemporary world.
Last Updated: 25 September 2015   [Located in Category: Study and Analysis]
Learn more about enslaved Africans and their descendants living in the Chesapeake, Carolinas, and Caribbean during the Colonial and Ante-Bellum Periods. Analyze and compare archaeological assemblages and architectural plans from different sites at unprecedented levels of detail.
Last Updated: 25 September 2015   [Located in Category: Trans Atlantic Slave Trade]
The Digital Library on American Slavery is an expanding resource compiling various independent online collections focused upon race and slavery in the American South, made searchable through a single, simple interface. There is considerable data contained on the site relating to all 15 slave states and Washington, D.C., including detailed personal information about slaves, slaveholders, and free people of color. It contains information on about 80,000 enslaved and 8,000 free blacks and 62,000 whites, culled from petitions, wills, inventories, deeds, bills of sale, depositions, and court proceedings.
Last Updated: 24 January 2016   [Located in Category: Study and Analysis]
These selected sites offer access to free, high-quality databases of books, articles, oral histories, images, maps, interviews, and television programs. Some sites are specifically devoted to Africa and/or the African Diaspora, while others are more general but include materials of interest to research in the history and cultures of the black world.
Last Updated: 24 January 2016   [Located in Category: Study and Analysis]
This is a digital publishing initiative site which provides access to digitized primary materials offering Southern perspectives on American history and culture. It supplies teachers, students, and researchers at every educational level with a wide array of titles they can use for reference, studying, teaching, and research. The site includes slave and ex-slave narratives.
Last Updated: 24 January 2016   [Located in Category: Study and Analysis]
In response to these challenges, Matrix: The Center for Digital Humanities & Social Sciences at Michigan State University, in partnership with the MSU Department of History and scholars at multiple institutions, has begun work on Enslaved: People of the Historic Slave Trade, a constellation of software and services built to address these challenges. Enslaved’s primary focus is people—individuals who were enslaved, owned slaves, or participated in slave trading.
Last Updated: 20 August 2018   [Located in Category: Trans Atlantic Slave Trade]
The University of Pittsburgh hosts an online exhibition of "freedom papers" and other documents which tell the story of slavery and the murkiness of forced indenture in Western Pennsylvania.
Last Updated: 11 August 2019   [Located in Category: Study and Analysis]
The Geography of Slavery project contains more than 4000 advertisements for runaway slaves and indentured servants, drawn from newspapers in Virginia and Maryland, covering the years from 1736 through 1803. The ads can be accessed in three different ways. First, you can search the ads based on values such as date of publication, place names mentioned, and ad type. Second, you can browse through the ads by date of publication or by place names mentioned. Third, you can perform a full-text search of the ads.
Last Updated: 20 May 2020   [Located in Category: Runaway Slave Ads]
In August of 2015, Georgetown University launched a new effort to reflect on, engage with, and learn from its historic ties to slavery. The Working Group on Slavery, Memory, and Reconciliation was appointed and charged by Georgetown University President John J. DeGioia in September to study and make recommendations to help guide the University’s ongoing work related to slavery and its legacies.
Last Updated: 6 September 2016   [Located in Category: Study and Analysis]
The Harlem African Burial Ground Task Force is a group of concerned citizens who have united to help the Elmendorf Reformed Church to restore and memorialize its historically and culturally significant colonial African burial ground at 1st Avenue, between 126th and 127th Streets in New York City.
Last Updated: 8 September 2018   [Located in Category: Slave Burials]
The Harriet Tubman Institute is dedicated to capturing, studying, and telling the story of the migration of African peoples around the globe, from centuries ago to the present day. We search the world for materials that help us know and understand this history – from official and personal documents to photographs, interviews and maps. Using leading-edge digital technology, we preserve and make these accessible to anyone with an interest in seeing and learning from this rich store of information. As an institute of scholars, we also conduct an extensive program of research, publication, and post-graduate studies.
Last Updated: 20 August 2018   [Located in Category: Slave Burials]
This HeinOnline collection brings together, for the first time, all essential legal materials on slavery in the United States and the English-speaking world. This includes every statute passed by every colony and state on slavery, every federal statute dealing with slavery, and all reported state and federal cases on slavery.
Last Updated: 24 October 2016   [Located in Category: Slavery and the Law]
The Hunts Point Slave Burial Ground (HPSBG) Project seeks to definitively locate and commemorate the lives of slaves that lived in Hunts Point, Bronx, New York. Though the graves may have been obliterated their lives shall be remembered. The project works with students from PS 48, a New York City public school, alongside local historians, community organizations, museums, and city agencies to investigate the final resting place of the slaves from various historical and prominent New York families.
Last Updated: 28 January 2016   [Located in Category: Slave Burials]
The International Slavery Museum opened in August 2007 and in March 2010 welcomed its millionth visitor. It is the only museum of its kind to look at aspects of historical and contemporary slavery as well as being an international hub for resources on human rights issues.
Last Updated: 25 September 2015   [Located in Category: Study and Analysis]
As a division of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture (New York Public Library), the Lapidus Center's mission is to generate and disseminate scholarly knowledge on the slave trade, slavery, and anti-slavery pertaining to the Atlantic World.
Last Updated: 24 January 2016   [Located in Category: Study and Analysis]
Tom Blake has spent many years identifying the largest slaveholders on the 1860 U.S. census and matching those surnames to African American households listed in the 1870 census (the first census to enumerate the former slaves by name). He estimates that these large slaveholders held 20-30% of the total number of enslaved people in the United States in 1860.
Last Updated: 11 August 2019   [Located in Category: Trans Atlantic Slave Trade]
Last Seen offers genealogists and researchers a new tool for telling family stories of separation and survival during slavery, emancipation, and Civil War. The site offers easy access to thousands of “Information Wanted” advertisements, taken out by former slaves and United States Colored Troops searching for family members lost by sale, flight, or enlistment. The ads mention family members, often by name, and also by physical description, circumstances of separation, last seen locations, and at times by the name of a former slaveholder.
Last Updated: 1 May 2020   [Located in Category: Slave Burials]
Nantes, France’s largest slave port. Between the 15th and 19th centuries, numerous European ports such as Liverpool, London, Bristol, Nantes, La Rochelle, Bordeaux, Amsterdam and Lisbon were involved in the slave trade. During the 18th century, Nantes became France’s largest slave port.
Last Updated: 25 September 2015   [Located in Category: Trans Atlantic Slave Trade]
The National Burial Database of Enslaved Americans (NBDEA) documents and preserves data on graves and burial grounds of enslaved Americans. The NBDEA is a work of the Periwinkle Heritage Initiative, based at Fordham University. The database is currently in development.
Last Updated: 25 September 2015   [Located in Category: Slave Burials]
Documented Slave Plantations of North Carolina is a comprehensive database of various plantations derived from a variety of information mediums.
Last Updated: 22 May 2017   [Located in Category: Study and Analysis]
The North Carolina Runaway Slave Advertisements project provides online access to all known runaway slave advertisements (more than 5000 items) published in North Carolina newspapers from 1751 to 1865. These brief ads provide a glimpse into the social, economic, and cultural world of the American slave system and the specific experience within North Carolina. Working from microfilmed copies of these rare publications, the project team scanned the ads to provide digital images, create full-text transcripts and descriptive metadata, and develop a searchable database. The NCRSA website includes digital scans of the ads, contextual essays to address their historical research value, full text transcripts, an annotated bibliography to aid researchers, and a searchable database.
Last Updated: 20 May 2020   [Located in Category: Runaway Slave Ads]
The Periwinkle Initiative is a public humanities and education initiative with the important mission of creating the National Burial Database of Enslaved Americans – the first and only national database to document individual burials and burial grounds of enslaved Americans. Institutional partners and advisors to the Periwinkle Initiative include the National Park Service, Fordham University, UNESCO, and the Gilder Lehrman Center at Yale University.
Last Updated: 1 May 2020   [Located in Category: Slave Burials]
The Buncombe County Register of Deeds office has kept property records since the late 1700’s. In our records one can find a wealth of information about the history of our community. On this page, we have compiled a list of the documents that record the trade of people as slaves in Buncombe County.
Last Updated: 11 August 2019   [Located in Category: Slave in Court Records]
Similar to Buncombe County, this compilation of documents lists records of the trade of people as slaves within the Iredell county.
Last Updated: 11 August 2019   [Located in Category: Slave in Court Records]
RunawayCT.org is a digital humanities resource for the study of runaway slaves in Connecticut, conceived and executed by a Digital Humanities class at Wesleyan University. The site provides free access to a searchable database of runaway slave ads published in the Connecticut Courant, accompanied by scholarly content providing context and insight into slavery-era Connecticut. Runawayct.org also provides interactive features for an enriched and engaging user experience, including a maps feature for geographic visualization of data on runaways. The project is intended for use in independent research and as an educational resource to be used by Connecticut area educators in US History classes and the like. The site is a project and ongoing experiment; the site’s content is limited to runaway ads from the Connecticut Courant simply because a more extensive survey of Connecticut newspapers would not have been possible within the given timeframe of the project.
Last Updated: 20 May 2020   [Located in Category: Runaway Slave Ads]
Runaway Slave Ads cover the period from 1842 to 1863 and primarily advertise slaves that ran away from the Baltimore County, Maryland area. Louis Diggs originally posted them to the AfriGeneas Mail List in 1996 and 1997. They were researched and compiled by Julie Dematteis and transcribed and annotated by Louis Diggs. They work together on historical research.
Last Updated: 20 May 2020   [Located in Category: Runaway Slave Ads]
Slave Biographies: The Atlantic Database Network is an open access data repository of information on the identities of enslaved people in the Atlantic World. Phase one of the multi-stage project expands on the work of Dr. Gwendolyn Midlo Hall, freely available on the Afro-Louisiana History & Genealogy site, including descriptions of slaves and their manumissions found in documents of all kinds in all jurisdictions of French, Spanish, and early American Lower Louisiana (1719–1820). Also included is the Maranhão Inventories Slave Database (MISD), which includes information about the lives of about 8,500 slaves in Maranhāo from the mid-eighteenth century through the early nineteenth century.
Last Updated: 11 August 2019   [Located in Category: Study and Analysis]
The project objective is to record information about named enslaved people whenever and whereever they may be found so that African-American genealogists and family historians may break through the wall that is the 1870 census. Documents such as wills and other probate records, bills of sale, court cases and newspaper advertisements for runaway slaves are often rich sources of information.
Last Updated: 11 August 2019   [Located in Category: Study and Analysis]
The Slave Societies Digital Archive (formerly Ecclesiastical and Secular Sources for Slave Societies), directed by Jane Landers and hosted at Vanderbilt University, preserves endangered ecclesiastical and secular documents related to Africans and African-descended peoples in slave societies. SSDA holdings include close to 500,000 digital images drawn from more than 1,500 unique volumes dating from the sixteenth through twentieth centuries that document the lives of an estimated four to six million individuals.
Last Updated: 20 August 2018   [Located in Category: Study and Analysis]
The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database has information on more than 35,000 slave voyages that forcibly embarked over 12 million Africans for transport to the Americas between the sixteenth and nineteenth centuries. It offers researchers, students and the general public a chance to rediscover the reality of one of the largest forced movements of peoples in world history.
Last Updated: 11 August 2019   [Located in Category: Trans Atlantic Slave Trade]
Although based on the website of the California Department of Insurance, both the List of Slaves and List of Slaveholders include the names of slaves and slaveholders throughout the United States. Similar resources may be available from other states as well -- search for slave insurance registry along with a state name. One good example is the Illinois Slavery Era Insurance Policies Registry.
Last Updated: 11 August 2019   [Located in Category: Study and Analysis]
The records of the Southern Claims Commission are a rich source of details on African Americans in the southern U.S., including names and ages of former slaves, their places of residence, names of slave owners, slave manumissions, slave ownership of property, conditions faced by free blacks, and a great deal of first-person background on what it was like to be an African American both during slavery and after the Civil War.
Last Updated: 11 August 2019   [Located in Category: Study and Analysis]
This database is part of the FamilySearch.org Wiki page and will help you locate digitized searchable collections as well as digitized microfilms in the FamilySearch catalog related to slavery and bondage. The page is arranged by state. FamilySearch Research Wiki is a free, online genealogy and family history guide that lists websites, provides research strategies, and suggests records and resources to help you find ancestors from all over the world.
Last Updated: 1 May 2020   [Located in Category: Study and Analysis]
Includes a list of slave deeds culled from record books, and research by Miel Wilson along with contemporary newspaper accounts and advertisements researched by Bob Moore.
Last Updated: 11 August 2019   [Located in Category: Slave in Court Records]
The Texas Runaway Slave Project is a database of runaway slave advertisements, articles, and notices from newspapers published in Texas, as well as materials from court records, manuscript collections, and books. It documents more than 2,500 fugitive slaves from Texas. The project is ongoing and new content is regularly added to the webpage.
Last Updated: 20 May 2020   [Located in Category: Runaway Slave Ads]
On 4 September 2015, UNESCO’s Slave Route project, in association with the Galerie Vallois, the cultural organization Fait à Cuba and the French National Committee for the memory and history of slavery (CNMHE), has organized an important event at UNESCO headquarters in order to explore the interactions between arts and the memory of slavery.
Last Updated: 25 September 2015   [Located in Category: Study and Analysis]
A collaboration of UNESCO’s Slave Route Project, The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, and dozens of sites and museums across the globe, Slavery and Remembrance aims to broaden our understandings of a shared past shaped by slavery and slave trade, the ways in which we collectively remember and forget, and the power of legacies to forge our present and future.
Last Updated: 25 September 2015   [Located in Category: Study and Analysis]
This ongoing project of the Virginia Historical Society will eventually include the names of all the enslaved Virginians that appear in their manuscript collections (unpublished documents). In some cases there may only be a name on a list; in others more details survive, including family relationships, occupations, and life dates. Some of the names appearing in this database may be individuals who lived outside of Virginia; found, for example, in plantation records kept by Virginians who moved to other states. Unknown No Longer does NOT contain names that may appear in published sources at the Virginia Historical Society (VHS) or in unpublished sources located in other repositories. This database is focused solely on slave names found in the unpublished collections of the VHS.
Last Updated: 11 August 2019   [Located in Category: Study and Analysis]
The society's holdings of African American materials consist largely of the records of slaves and slavery in the Old Dominion. Other materials concern the African colonization movement, freedmen and women in the immediate post–Civil War era, black educators in the early and middle twentieth century, and desegregation in modern Virginia.
Last Updated: 22 May 2017   [Located in Category: Study and Analysis]
The almost seven hours of recorded interviews presented here took place between 1932 and 1975 in nine Southern states. Twenty-three interviewees, born between 1823 and the early 1860s, discuss how they felt about slavery, slaveholders, coercion of slaves, their families, and freedom. Several individuals sing songs, many of which were learned during the time of their enslavement.
Last Updated: 24 January 2016   [Located in Category: Slave Narratives]
The Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition, a part of the Whitney and Betty MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies at Yale, is dedicated to the investigation and dissemination of knowledge concerning all aspects of chattel slavery and its destruction.
Last Updated: 25 September 2015   [Located in Category: Study and Analysis]